Bow Ties Sydney, Australia - Le Noeud Papillon - Specialists In Self Tying Bow Ties


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Monday, March 31, 2014

Understanding Symmetry And Proportion

De-rigeur in the games of menswear is that the bow tie should never exceed the width between the two farthest points of the eyes. Many men, especially smaller gentlemen, who sport the oversized bow ties of strongly defined fashion brands that push an agenda each year, don't realise that they fall prey to looking borderline ridiculous when they walk into a black tie event. That's because if you took a front on portrait and drew lines down the side, the bow tie would be jutting out on either side of those farthest points. Symmetry is of course something very important in the art of the bow tie. For it is the attempt to display symmetry whilst concurrently having a certain amount of asymmetry that effectively makes one bow tie wearer nod to another bow tie wearer.

As a gentleman rattled off to me over drinks last night, there is a certain phallic symbolism in men wearing a tie for semi-formal events, but when it comes to dressing up to a bow tie, the symbolism becomes something even more personal, it becomes more testicular than phallic. And this is perhaps what constitutes the left side dropping lower than the right. Enjoy our limited edition bow ties and chase that symmetrical asymmetry you know only too well for yourself. www.lenoeudpapillon.com 

Magnus Omme's portrait of Mikael Winblad for Le Noeud Papillon Of Sydney, near perfect proportions and the right amount of asymmetry in a symmetrical way. 

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