Bow Ties Sydney, Australia - Le Noeud Papillon - Specialists In Self Tying Bow Ties


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Monday, October 29, 2012

A Black Silk Tie Finished In The Artisan Way

Seldom do I receive a compliment on my ties. They are overlooked because of the fact that we specialise in bow ties. Selling ties is about three times as hard as selling bow ties. Firstly, the market place is full of ties, secondly, the tie makers have a much bigger pool of customers who are segmented. They will buy their ties because of their vocation, their position in the company, their lifestyle, their individual personality. It is just a very difficult business. However, this European summer we were introduced to a new tie maker in Italy. His work arrived this morning and I have to say, it is of a different calibre. Totally made by hand, the tie is finished with a great deal of attention to detail. My photos do not do the tie justice. Photographing ties was also another reason why we've never gone full steam ahead on ties. I have not once found a website that really knows how to present ties well. All of that aside, below you will see the 7cm tie we are running for formal wear. It is a black satin basket weave, bar tacked front and back, lightly lined, a horizontal bar line on the front of the tie woven in and a lovely feel in the hand. This is our contribution to the tie world, one for formal wear. Available now online at www.lenoeudpapillon.com
Black silk basket weave satin bow tie from Le Noeud Papillon - 7cm wide and totally made by hand from start to finish in Italy. 



Evening Scarves Just In Today!

Red satin silk with contrast navy cashmere. A total luxury for a man. 

Keeping with monchromatic trends this white and black contrast cashmere evening scarf is a must for the man who already has everything else.
 Our evening scarves have just come in. They are hand-made in Italy using the finest silk satin and cashmere. The fringe is also hand-made. The price of these scarves is $395.00 AUD. Because of the high cost to produce these scarves, we will not be offering them out to the stores and they will remain exclusively online at www.lenoeudpapillon.com .

The Interview As It Was Heard On ABC 702

Thursday, October 25, 2012

The Importance Of Thread

Here are the notes from our meeting with Dominic Knight on ABC 702 24.10.2012. We apologise if there are any factual errors within our discourse. The information was assembled using the websites of Gutterman, Coats, Wikipedia, Google and Sewalot.Com. 


Why is it important? 

Thread is used to bind seams in industries relating to apparel and footwear, textiles manufacturing, automotive, technology, military, book binding, white goods manufacturing, horse riding saddles, camping and even motor parts. A world without thread would simply mean the world would come undone… 
Despite companies such as Nike developing fusing technologies to chemically bond seams in production, thread remains the main way in which human beings bind seams and or make fabrics.

How do we define it?

Thread is a kind of yarn which is used for sewing
Yarn is a long continuous length of interlocked fibres
Thread yarn is used in production of textiles, sewing, crocheting, knitting, weaving, embroidery and ropemaking to name but a few aspects of it’s use. 
Thread is sewn either by hand or by machine.
Thread is either natural or synthetic .
Animal fibres include alpaca, angora, mohair, llama, cashmere, silk, cat, dog, ostrich and turkey.
Other naturally occurring fibres are bamboo, cotton, soy, corn, hemp and reeds.
Synthetic fibre examples are nylon, polyester, rayon, viscose. Generally we refer to synthetic fibres as ‘acrylics’.
Blending fibres in thread will add different qualities such as strength, lustre, elasticity, warmth, softness. 
The most commonly blended thread is cotton with polyester and wool with acrylic.
Some of the most recent advances are fibre optic threads for transferring data, Kevlar threads for making bullet proof clothing and fire-retardant threads for production in things such as mattresses.

Threads have been around since the upper paleolithic times (late stone age, from 50,000 to 10,000 years ago). The first needles were thorns, the first threads were made of naturally occurring threads such as bamboo, hemp or reeds.

What happens when you create a thread?

The first thing you need to do is spin the thread. The act of spinning thread was one of the first processes to be industrialised. Once the thread has been spun it forms what is called ‘singles’. The singles are then twisted together to form plies. Depending on which direction it is twisted, it either forms an S or a Z twist.
Another type of thread offered is from filament yarns.  Filament yarns are made up of filament fibres which are long continuous fibres which are either grouped together or twisted together. The best naturally occurring filament fibre is silk. Longer fibres also create a smooth lustre to fabric.

Yarn is usually sold in skeins, the most common sizes are 25g, 50 grams or 100 grams. However, many companies sell thread yarn on bobbins. Generally speaking the bobbins are measured in yards with the measurement to work out the size of the thread using the Gunze count. 

The Gunze Count  is broken up into two measurements. Here is an example:
60 /3 – the first measurement 60 refers to the number of kilometres of thread to make up 1 kilogram of weight. The second number, 3, is the number of plies that have been twisted together. 
By this rationale, a high value means a light weight thread for use in say making a shirt, whereas a low value is a thicker thread used for decorative stitching, upholstery or shoe making.

Two companies to note in the thread industry are Coats and Gutterman

Gutterman started in 1864 in Vienna by Max Gutterman who took the off cuts of silk production and began turning it into thread. Today it is one of the most famous thread companies in the world creating thread in a wide variety of forms. From the 1950’s onwards they began trialling synthetic (acrylic polyester) thread and today the company mostly produces thread using synthetics. Whilst cotton and silk are still available, they are not as common as they once were. Some threads are made using blends such as cotton and polyester. This gives strength and especially when mercerized, it also gives a fancy lustre finish. 
Max Gutterman is also said to be the first person  to sell thread by length in yards as opposed to by weight. This began at the 1873 World Exhibition in Vienna.

Another famous company for making thread in the world is Coats. Coats was originally started by the Clark family in 1755 when they began to spin cotton into thread. The Clarks and the Coats families were from Paisley in Scotland. Eventually the two companies merged. During it’s heyday, Paisly was synonymous with fabric and the birthplace of the famous print which originated from the East.
Until the rise of Napoleon in the early 1800’s, there was no real demand for cotton thread or any thread other than silk. Nearly all of this thread came from the East. The Napoleonic wars disrupted the transportation and sale of silk thread. This was the beginning of the move away from silk thread to other fibres. During this period the sale of silk thread on the English black market reached feverish prices for those willing to risk the leg work to get from France to England. A reel of silk thread was as much as two days worth of pay for a worker.

The conclusion of WWII and the rise of polymer technology meant that from the 1950’s onwards synthetic threads (acrylics) would see the demise of the demand for silk thread. Today the most commonly sold thread is cotton-polyester and the industry is pushing a lot of nylon/polyester core thread with a cotton exterior. This kind of thread gives strength and durability for garment making and the ability for sewing machines to work at high speeds without breaking the thread strand, increasing efficiency in manufacturing.


Thread being spun

Silk Thread - reading the Gunze count at the top this is 30/3 silk thread meaning that there is 30 kilometres of thread in length per kilogram of weight and it is a 3 ply thread.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Guerreisms A Beacon Of Light And Colour

Guerreisms must truly be the number one blog for me for menswear street photography. Below are my favourite picks that Guerre recently uploaded. The first favourite, the orange below, is naturally a response to my recent choice to feature this colour in our new collection of bows. Some other points to note. The light blue shirt with a cutaway white collar on a bone coloured double breasted suit jacket - killer look.  In the third photo you will see the flirtation of jacket lining. The wonderful use of a vibrant jacket lining is that it is for me what it is for the wind to pick up a young ladies skirt and show you her suspenders. It tells you a little about the person without giving away the package and making you want to know more. If you are off to your tailors, ask for a a vibrant interlining, it is worth it. From the fourth photo note the John Lennonesque sunglasses, a shape which immediately sends off eccentric signals. If you have not logged onto Guerreisms before, perhaps now might be the time. 

What seems to be an orange birdseye, yes!

As I would like to appear some day soon. Peppered but dignified.

A man's equivalent to seeing up your skirt.... vibrant jacket linings, a way to flirt with the crowd when the wind blows.

Rounded glasses, yes.

For some reason I love the contrast between tie and pocket square and jacket and waistcoat. It's all at 6's and 7's but somehow it still works for me.

Foulards - yes. 

It Can Get Too Academic Sometimes

Sometimes you can over-complicate things. I was once told by my old music teacher who had the hairiest hands that Mozart had once experimented with nine different notes using some ancien liquid paper technique to cut and paste one note over the other on his music sheet. When historians peeled back the nine notes they found that Mozart had settled on the first note that he had tried. Or, in other words, as Winston Churchill once said of the Americans, 'they will always do the right thing once they have exhausted all other options'. With those two observations in mind we set about trying to create the perfect single piece bow tie with just enough body. Our aim was to please Simon Crompton of Permanent Style as he had noted in an email that he was particularly interested in the single piece bows. We decided to use our classic black mogador silk and begin to use a contrast 30/3 thread stitch to signify which interlining was which. We used our standard interlining, cotton and wool. Our standard is made of polyester and it has been an amazing interlining with very little headaches at all, but just to be academic we decided to try natural fibres instead. The result? I am not going to tell you! You will have to order a single piece bow tie for me to give you the answer!!! In the meantime, one of those bows is off to England for the appraisal of Mr. Crompton.

Orange thread label denoting our standard interlining fabric
Standard finish on a one piece bow

Blue stitched label - a foray into cotton interlining

The cotton finish

 
Red denotes the use of wool


Batwing bow ties in one piece used to experiment with linings

Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Crimes Against Fashion, The Top Offences Australian Men Comit According To Patrick Johnson


In researching for the Melbourne Cup I stumbled upon this article on The Punch.Com.Au from Australian tailor Patrick Johnson which still remains relevant for Australian men this year. It is quite an amusing read. Perhaps one day it will be a featured period piece of writing  regarding the status quo of men's fashion in year dot.
Top 10  Crimes Against Fashion (Suiting) by Patrick Johnson
1. Eyewear
Avoid wearing sports sunglasses with a suit. It doesn’t make you look like a blues brother, it makes you look like a PE teacher at a wedding.
2. Tags
Cut the manufacturers tag off the sleeve of your suit. It’s amazing how many people leave them on. If you need to flash the label of your suit to prove its worthiness then you should get a new tailor.
3. Buttons
If you don’t want to look like you are facing up for your first court appearance then don’t button up all the buttons on you suit jacket. For a two button jacket only button the top button. On a three button jacket, button the middle button always and the top button only occasionally.
4. Walking to work
Unless you are channelling Jerry Seinfield, avoid wearing chunky white trainers with a suit. If you want to exercise then wear a track suit.
5. Shoulders
Its not 1991 and you’re not a American footballer so don’t wear shoulder pads that are overly thick with suit shoulders that are too wide. The shape of a suit’s shoulder is very important, it dictates the suit’s cut and is the tailor’s signature.
Furthermore it’s the only part of the suit that can’t be altered, so make sure the shoulder is right.
Trust your own instincts and don’t let the sales person’s flattery push you towards the wrong shoulder.
6.  Socks
With the exception of the occasional pleasing colour pop that can be achieved with the well thought out use of a simple pair of plain bright socks (ie. Red), stick to socks within the grey, navy or black family. Don’t wear bright striped socks, they won’t make you look like a dandy, they’ll make you look like a twat whose girlfriend bought his socks.
7.  Sleeves
A baggy sleeve looks sloppy and makes the whole suit look shapeless. The sleeves of your jacket should provide enough room to be comfortable, but no more. Assuming your shirts are the correct length, the suit’s sleeve should stop 1cm before the shirts cuff.
8. Pimpin’ Loafers
Pointy loafers in white/ light brown (or any colour for that matter) that turn up at the end look awful.
When the sales person tells you “these are all the rage in Italy”, that usually means, we got the stock really cheap because they stopped wearing these in Italy 5 years ago. If you are a South American drug kingpin then I apologize.
Try to find a relatively plain pair of black lace ups for a navy/ grey suit.
9. Belts with suits - don’t do it
Belts with formal suits don’t work, especially when wearing a tie. 
Instead use trousers with side adjusters. A belt breaks up the flow of the outfit, which results in your legs looking shorter. They also create unnecessary bulk. 
If you are going to wear a belt then please choose one that matches the color and material of your shoes. Also choose a belt with a small, discrete buckle.
Socks - Light weight cotton socks by companies such as Bresciani or Pantherella are perfect for our warmer climate. They are available at Henry Bucks (Australia wide) and American Tailors (Melbourne).
Suits - I’m probably a bit biased, but.... See here

Monday, October 22, 2012

The Same Poem Read By Dostoyevsky

In a re-enactment, Dostoyevsky reads Pushkin's 'Prophet' to an audience.

On Revisiting The Family Prophet

I had not seen my old Russian masseur for almost 10 years. The other morning the pain in my ankle was so bad that I was told by another that it was time to revisit our old Prophet. I had stopped believing in him a long time ago when I thought I knew everything. Now I knew nothing of how to solve my health issues, so I went to him with an open mind.

He began by pressing parts of my stomach and thigh like on and off buttons. Then he would rub one area; then come back to the other as though my body was merely a grand organ in which only he could find the tune. Eventually I said 'We have not seen each other for a long time. Do you know in the last ten years I have read a lot of the Russian authors from the 19th Century.' His eyes lit up, like Russian eyes do, with a fervent madness and a zest for life which makes you believe you might have opened Pandora's box. 'Vell, let me shhow you somfink you von't believe, see zis, you see zis painting' he said of a Nikolai Ge painting he had retrieved on his iPad, 'zis is ze trooth zay were looking for' and he continued on with his diatribe until he arrived at a video of The Prophet by Alexander Pushkin. Now I was completely enthralled and I was on the mad Russian carpet ride along side him. He could have told me to drink caravan tea from a Samovar for one month straight with no food and I would have followed him in for the journey. Oh those Russians!





The Prophet By Alexander Pushkin

With fainting soul athirst for Grace,
I wandered in a desert place,
And at the crossing of the ways
I saw a sixfold Seraph blaze;
He touched mine eyes with fingers light
As sleep that cometh in the night:
And like a frightened eagle's eyes,
They opened wide with prophecies.
He touched mine ears, and they were drowned
With tumult and a roaring sound:
I heard convulsion in the sky,
And flight of angel hosts on high,
And beasts that move beneath the sea,
And the sap creeping in the tree.
And bending to my mouth he wrung
From out of it my sinful tongue,
And all its lies and idle rust,
And 'twixt my lips a-perishing
A subtle serpent's forkèd sting
With right hand wet with blood he thrust.
And with his sword my breast he cleft,
My quaking heart thereout he reft,
And in the yawning of my breast
A coal of living fire he pressed.
Then in the desert I lay dead,
And God called unto me and said:
"Arise, and let My voice be heard,
Charged with My will go forth and span
The land and sea, and let My word
Lay waste with fire the heart of man."

Women In Our Bow Ties

Cecylia, a blogger from Melbourne, received an Amanda bow tie from us. That bow tie is part of Cecylia's new blogging article. The other woman who received an Amanda bow tie from us is recording artist Sarah Blasko. The Amanda is a limited edition black with red hearts silk. I think that both of these women are very good ambassadors for our bows. What do you think?





Sunday, October 21, 2012

Bow Ties And The Lipstick Effect

I was having lunch with an artist today, a very intelligent artist who probably does not receive enough praise for what he does, but who wished to remain anonymous for the fantastic quote which came out of his mouth very much ad lib. He was describing a cocktail party which took place in Sydney recently. He said:

"I decided to wear my purple suit and your bow tie, because I was the 'art dealer' for the evening. You know, bow ties are like lipstick for men. They are our cheap luxury"

The quote, which for me made me fall off my chair in laughter, was something which I immediately needed to start voice recording on my Android which brought a concerned look over my friend's face. "You're not going to quote me are you?" - Well yes, I am going to quote you, but anonymously. 

The reason why his quote resonated, as all great quotes do, is that there was some truth to it. Our bow ties are $155.00 Australian dollars. In order to buy a fancy tie from a top European brand you need $240.00. For a Tom Ford bow tie in Sydney, you need $290.00. A decent quality shirt, you need $280.00. A new suit - anywhere from $499 - $6000.00. For a good quality cashmere scarf you need around $300.00. Our bow ties, which generate all the jazz you need around your neck, draw people's attention away from the fact that your wool is last season or that your shirt needs a new collar soon.... are comparatively a cheap luxury. Or, what they refer to in economics as The Lipstick Effect. Here is an excerpt of a good article recently posted on the phenomenon. Read it here:


"Yes, the economy is tight but that doesn’t mean women are willing to give up what some experts call ‘affordable luxuries’. Even in the current slowdown, sales for makeup, accessories and salon services are holding strong. So if you are someone who loves the world of fashion and beauty, now would be a great time to consider a career in these fields. Certification programs in cosmetology, massage therapy and other salon treatments are a great way to start and many programs can be structured around your current work schedule or family obligations.

As the chief operations officer at one beauty company recently observed, “…our business stays afloat in the best and in the worst times…because skin care and makeup are an affordable luxury. People aren’t taking those big vacations or building their wardrobe for fall. They aren’t buying a Chanel suit or an outfit from the runway, but they can certainly identify and replicate a trend in makeup.“

In the world of advertising and marketing, it’s called the “lipstick effect.” It’s a long-standing theory that holds that shoppers treat themselves to small luxuries when economic times are tough. Today, it extends beyond lipstick — even if a woman can’t afford a trip to a swanky spa, she can enjoy a facial or massage. A manicure and pedicure provides many working moms with a needed pick-me-up. And beauty supply stores and salons report business is brisk.

A recent study from the NPD Group, a NYC based market research firm, confirms this trend. Even during the worst of the recent recession, make-up counters and beauty salons kept their clients, and boutique owners report sales in inexpensive pick-me-ups like costume jewelry and other accessories are on the rise."



Wednesday, October 17, 2012

Silk Yarn Thread For Top Stitching

As far as tailoring goes, I know very little. More than the average joe maybe, but it is an endless knowledge base which is changing day by day as machines are updated, workrooms experiment, thread qualities change, new fabrics are blended, society's tastes change etc etc. One facet of textiles manufacturing which is at the core of good tailoring, is sewing. Sewing has its own world on the internet. Websites, forums, online workshops abound the world wide web. Another great aspect of the internet is that it gives people a place to store and sell that knowledge to others, but the mere fact that it is being documented and stored means that it isn't being lost, which is a very very good thing. The world has to thank women for this. If it weren't for their continual interest in garment making and home arts and crafts - a lot of the more obscure stitch work might well have been lost.

Recently I have been obsessed with one facet of tailoring - silk yarn thread stitch work for top stitching. Specifically, I have been interested in 30/3 silk yarn because it is hard to come by in Sydney, Australia. This roll below is over 20 years old and came from Perivale which is no longer operational in Sydney from what I am allowed to find using the Oracle (Google). If any of you Englishmen out there know anything about the English Perivale company and whether or not it still exists, please leave a note below. In the meantime, I have found myself a brand new supplier of silk thread but I am going to have to keep it hush hush because we are working on a new product which I don't wish to jump the gun about. The silk 30/3 thread seems to be ideal in top stitching a tailored jacket and certainly in my own experience of its application in one of our LNP jackets, it worked a treat. The same thread, I believe, is also used by tie makers to create the slip stitch and loop in a hand-made tie. Having spent the day researching silk thread, I can tell you that there is a fantastic page out there with a small history of thread by Alex Askaroff  on Sewalot.Com. If you have the time or the inclination, you will find that is a very rewarding read. So, whilst nylon, cotton, linen and polyester thread all has it's place, there is something slippery, shiny and serpenty about silk thread that is keeping me interested in knowing more about it. 


30/3 silk yarn, fantastic for a top stitch

The Man Who Holds The Trophy Also Tied His Own Bow Tie


Another photo sent in from a Sydney based customer, Mr. Kyle Dewey (centre), shows the difference between a hand-tied bow tie and a pre-tied bow tie. I think, without trying to put too much emphasis on the point, that there is an argument for tying your own bow tie in this photo alone.

All Good Things Come To Those That Wait

In the 1998 film Ronin, Robert De Niro imparts some wisdom which we have heard time and time again in our ordinary lives, but which seems to have an added effect when it comes from his mouth. All Good Things Come To Those That Wait...

You may recall the expedition we undertook in Paris to develop a buste / torso which involved running around Paris and culminating in a dash out to Marche St Pierre in Montmartre to choose fabric. The buste, which is the work of Parisian atelier Siegel Stockman is finally ready. It is a good thing to be patient. Please have a look at the photos below. And a sincere thank you to our contact Annie-Paul Benhamou.





Monday, October 15, 2012

Stalking Your Christmas Shopping Wish List

As is always the case, when it comes to internet shopping for Christmas presents you need to be extra diligent and get onto the web a helluva lot earlier to make sure that you have a) the time taken for delivery and b) the most time available to capture any discounts that might be available to you. On this basis, I have decided to compile a list of products I like for both men and women which you can Stalk. The reason why you see Stalk with a capital S is because I am using StalkThis, a website in it's beta version and still in teething development which allows you to add a bookmark icon to your bookmarks bar and add shopping cart items from known websites which allows you then to monitor if the price and or stock levels go down or up, you can even set price parameters you are willing to pay for the item. All this in one page of your Stalk account. I find this very handy. I have been using it for two weeks now and I can tell you it is still teething but the concept really turns me on. You can log on using your facebook details and you can remove your account easily enough. Anyway, getting back to the shopping list. Click on the brand name to follow the link.

1. A back up orange pocket square from Hermès.
2. A coin purse from the Bentley range by Ettinger
3. A shawl collar cardigan from Drakes of London
4. A paisley tie from Charvet of Paris
5. A limited edition burgundy Akubra hat from Strand Hatters
6. Carbon fibre freediving fins from Adrenaline spearfishing
7. A competition backgammon board from Hector Saxe of Paris
8. A pair of summer board shorts from French label Kiwi of St. Tropez
9. A dive watch from Suunto of Finland.
10. This woman's 'Nancy' handbag from Smythson of London
11. A silk and cashmere scarf by Hermes
12. A pair of paisley slippers by Jimmy Choo
13. A Ladies Rolex Oyster Perpetual Day Date Just by Watch Time
14.  A vibrantly colourful table cloth from Jean Vier of pays Basque, France
15. A Union Jack cloaked bulldog by Royal Doulton at Peter's Of Kensington
16. A John Lennon ballpoint pen from Mont Blanc
17. An orange Antler suitcase from Peter's of Kensington
18. Pajamas by Zimmerli 
19.  A double breasted blazer by Al Bazar
20.  Valero brown messenger back from The Men's Shop
21. The Orangina bow tie from Le Noeud Papillon.....

A great summer day bag from The Men's Shop

Sunday, October 14, 2012

Another Silk Now Heads To The Cutting Table

Earlier you may have seen this silk as a vector graphics image which we posted as a new design we were working on. I am pleased to say that it is finished and that it will make a wonderful bow tie when it is ready. You can log onto www.lenoeudpapillon.com and contact us if you are interested in securing one before they go online. 

Success Sometimes Leads To Smoking

Two real estate agents, Kyle Dewey (left) and Hayden Bennett (right) won their respective awards at a real estate event last night in Sydney. Happy with themselves and with the taste of success in their mouths, they sent in this handsome photo of two nicely tied black silk mogador bow ties from none other than Le Noeud Papillon. Congratulations boys.


We Can't All Be Models - The New Orangina Bow Tie

Below I am wearing my first bone coloured suit that I received from Raja Fashions post alterations we did here in Sydney. My pocket square is from Hermes, my shirt is from my own collection of Carlo Riva shirting cloth that we ran for our shirt customers this year and my bow tie is the new Orangina model, a combination of orange mogador silk with white piping in a tie your own model giving it a certain non-conformity that I really like. About the hair, well, I have been very tight lately and I have been holding back from the barber's chair. The Orangina bow tie is available from the website and it will trickle into the stores in the coming weeks. 

Orangina bow tie, now available on the website

Friday, October 12, 2012

Fred Astaire's Words Still Stir Deeply



There once was a time when I was so in love with a woman who probably to this day does not know just how much I was besotted with her, that listening to this song, in its slower version on a 1940's nostalgia cd I once owned, brought haunting feelings to a restless young soul; of love, of yearning, of temptation, of nostalgia. Tonight it came into my head as if by a random act without warning. But perhaps nothing comes to us without some meaning or relevance. I think I was so exhausted, so withered and beaten and void of energy, that old demons bubbled up from the depths of my conciousness.

Just recently my music instructor who taught me to sing this song passed away. I had not seen her in four or five years, she was a beautiful soul and someone whom I admired greatly. When the news arrived I was on a call to Australia whilst on a train between Paris and Turin, I felt a terrible sense of loss, the tears flowing as I tried to bite my tongue so as not to disturb the other passengers. And the song I most remember her by? Night & Day by Cole Porter. Good night.

Tick Tock Went The Orange Clock....


The 24 Hour Sale (30% Off) On Our New Collection Starts Now! Log Onto www.lenoeudpapillon.com
Sale starts 8.00pm AEST 13.10.2012 - Ends 8.00pm 14.10.2012

Wave II; Spring Autumn 2012 Le Noeud Papillon New Silk Bow Ties


Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Food Glorious Food

If there is one thing I have never learned to do it is the art of eating without sullying your own clothes. Take the obstacles below. This here is two entrees shared between two people on a Saturday lunch. On the top right you have a cheese and onion gratin souffle which is greasy and stringy with cheese. It is a logistical nightmare. To the left you have a shared plate of linguini which is begging to flick oil and parts of some green vegetable matter, most likely basil or mint, which has been added to the dish. Now add the additional element that these are sharing plates and that the food needs to be passed around. I ask you the question, what chance do I have of staying clean?

Food, one of the great opposing forces to keeping clean and looking sharp


Thank Christ I Am Not A Model

The world should sigh a relief that men like myself are too large to sell products. Unfortunately I could not use my friend Gustav for all the shots because the sizes were too big for him. Welcome to the new collection of recently arrived dressing gowns that are here with us. Sample sizes are only available in the shot of  my Swedish friend and fellow tennis companion. I think he makes a much much better model than I do and it is a shame that you can't have him in all the photos. The sample sizes are M, L, XL and XXL. The dressing robes take approximately 6 weeks to make and are then shipped straight to your door. In the case of the red silk robe below, you will also be buying a piece of cinematic sartorial history, as the exact same robe was worn by Michael Corleone in the Godfather Part III when he is incapacitated in hospital. Enquire on our contact page here











Announcing The Winners! Now Hear This!!!

The old expression goes 'don't flog a dead horse', the thing that caught me surprise was that the horse was dead. The previous two bow tie competitions had been an enormous success with over 23 entries in one competition alone. I felt sure that you readers enjoyed it and that the participants liked being a part of sharing their own style. This time, however, it seems either I jumped the gun or people had moved on from our competition. It gives me great joy, though, in announcing the wonderful four entrants that have become the wonderful four winners. They will each be receiving one bow tie from the current collection of Le Noeud Papillon Of Sydney's bow ties and one from our next range of silks in 3 months time. Bravo!

Tomás Molina, Bogotá, Colombia



Eric Musgrave, London, England



Ray Frensham, London, England


Ben Pearson, Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada